25 Unusual Places Around the World – Part 2

2111 foot 8 Bridge

The 11 foot 8 Bridge (formally known as the Norfolk Southern–Gregson Street Overpass and nicknamed The Can-Opener) is a railroad bridge in Durham, North Carolina, United States, that has attracted media coverage and popular attention because tall vehicles such as trucks, buses, and RVs frequently collide with the unusually low overpass, resulting in damage ranging from RV roof air conditioners being scraped off to entire truck roofs being removed.


22Truth or Consequences

Truth or Consequences is a city in the county seat of Sierra County, New Mexico. It was originally named Hot Springs, but the city changed its name to “Truth or Consequences”, the title of a popular NBC Radio program. In March 1950, Ralph Edwards, the host of the radio quiz show Truth or Consequences, announced that he would air the program on its 10th anniversary from the first town that renamed itself after the show; Hot Springs won the honor, officially changing its name on March 31, 1950 (the program broadcast from there the following evening, April 1).


23Cardrona Bra Fence

The Cardrona Bra Fence was a controversial tourist attraction in Central Otago, in New Zealand. At some point between 1998 and 1999, passers-by began to attach bras to a rural fence. The fence gradually became a well-known site as the number of bras grew to hundreds. The fence is located on a public road reserve, adjacent to farm property in the Cardrona Valley area southwest of Wanaka, near to Cardrona.


24Sentinel Peak

Sentinel Peak is a 2,897 feet (883 meters) peak in the Tucson Mountains southwest of downtown Tucson, Arizona. In the 1910s University of Arizona students used local basalt rock to construct a 160-feet-tall block "A" on the mountain's east face, near its summit, giving the peak its other name, "A" Mountain. The peak is part of a 272-acre park, the largest natural resource park in the City of Tucson.


25Colma, California

Colma is a small incorporated town in San Mateo County, California, on the San Francisco Peninsula in the San Francisco Bay Area. The population was 1,792 at the 2010 census. The town was founded as a necropolis in 1924. With most of Colma's land dedicated to cemeteries, the population of the dead—about 1.5 million, as of 2006—outnumbers that of the living by nearly a thousand to one. This has led to Colma's being called "the City of the Silent" and has given rise to a humorous motto, now recorded on the city's website: "It's great to be alive in Colma."

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