22 Cracking Facts About Eggs You Need to Know

1Chickens

Though it is very rare, chickens can lay eggs that contain another complete egg inside.


2Refrigerating eggs

Refrigerating eggs is not necessary, and that in many countries outside the US, eggs are kept at room temperature. US regulations require that eggs be power-washed, which removes all organic matter (and any harmful bacteria) but also strips the egg's shell of its protective coating, thus rendering it more porous and open to contamination. A synthetic coating is often applied in commercial operations to combat this but the eggs are still refrigerated.


3Blood substitute

Due to their similar protein composition, blood can be used as an egg substitute in baking and making ice cream.


4US and UK eggs

US eggs would be illegal in a British supermarket because they are washed. British eggs are illegal in US markets because they are unwashed.


5Protein

You absorb roughly half the protein from an egg if you eat it raw vs cooking it. In other words, Rocky would have been better off frying his eggs as opposed to drinking them raw.


6Black swan eggs

An estimated one-quarter of all black swans pairings are of homosexual males. They steal nests or form temporary threesomes with females to obtain eggs, driving away from the female after she lays the eggs.


7Pinworm infection

Over 11% of all Americans are infected with parasitic Pinworms, which make your ass itch at night when they come crawling out of your anus to lay their eggs. This makes you scratch your ass and helps these sticky eggs spread, often to your own breakfast, thereby repeating the cycle.


8Fake chicken eggs

Fake chicken eggs are becoming a problem in China. They are made to look like the real thing from a mixture of resin, coagulant, and starch complete with pigment for color as well as a counterfeit shell. One person can make approximately 1500 of them per day.


9Easter Egg Chicken

The Araucana Chicken is also called the “Easter Egg Chicken” because it lays natural blue, green, pink, and brown eggs.


10Yolk

The word “yolk” is derived from an Old English word that means “yellow.” Therefore it is egg white and egg yellow.

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