History in Pics

41-moulin-rouge

The original Moulin Rouge the year before it burned down, Paris, France (1914). Moulin Rouge in French means “Red Mill”. The Hill of Montmartre, where the Moulin Rouge is, used to be covered with Mills. Two are still standing. This one and the other one that you can’t see properly from Google map. Here it is now, for comparison.

41-moulin-rouge2

Here is a photo of inside the Moulin Rouge after it was ravaged by a fire in 1915. There were much more Cabarets and weird nightclubs in that street that sadly don’t exist anymore. Here are some pics of them.


42-eugene-cernan

Eugene Cernan on the surface of the moon during Apollo 17 mission, 1972. He is probably teary-eyed because moondust is very sharp and very fine and hurts. One Apollo 17 crew member quoted: “I did all the transfer with my helmet off and I am sorry I did because the dust really bothered my eyes and throat. I was tasting it and eating it”.


43-chicago-cubs

Chicago Cubs team with the mascot, Chicago, Illinois, 1908.


44-school-principal

In 1971, high school principal R. Wiley Brownlee left a board meeting where he proposed the school district honor Martin Luther King, Jr. On the way to his Plymouth home from the meeting, Brownlee was forced to pull over around 10:30 p.m. because a vehicle was blocking part of a bridge ahead.

He slowed to a stop and KKK members in another car pulled up behind and blocked him. Brownleee said one of the men put a shotgun to his head and told him to turn off his lights and get out of the car. He was then knocked to the ground and one of the men pulled a five-gallon can of hot tar from another car and poured it on him from the shoulders down.

They threw chicken feathers on him and released him nearly two hours later. Brownlee returned to the high school to seek help and a high school student snapped a picture of him covered in tar.


45-new-pair-of-shoes

Boy receiving a new pair of shoes at an orphanage in Austria, 1946.

The picture was first published in LIFE magazine on December 30, 1946, with the following caption: “For many of Europe’s children, there was a Santa Claus this Christmas. When a big box from the American Red Cross arrived at Vienna’s Am Himmel orphanage, shoes and coats and dresses tumbled out. Like the youngster (above), the children who had seen no new clothes throughout the war smiled to high heaven. But for thousands of other European children, there was no Santa Claus. When a boatload of illegal Jewish immigrants arrived in Haifa, Palestine recently, two Polish children (opposite) got separated from their parents. Tears filled the eyes of the boy, and his wan sister clutched him protectively. They were later reunited with their parents, but the whole family was shipped to Cyprus.”

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